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Golden Retriever Puppy Training

When you hear the word training several different types come to mind when considering Golden retriever puppy training.

As you look to train your new puppy, there are three different training options.

The three discussed below are the primary types for training Golden retrievers and will help you decide which one is best for you and your new puppy at any point in time.

Behavior training

Behavior training is designed to teach your Golden Retriever puppy how to be a good dog.

This type of training involves house breaking, general behavior around people and other pets, leash training, and other situations to make him a better canine companion.

Dogs passing obedience training are well suited to handle various situations regardless of where you decide to take them.

Activity training

Activity training teaches your dog activities such as hunting, herding, search and rescue, and other activities you two can do together. This type of training is very popular with Golden Retrievers, because as cements the relationship between you and your dog more interesting and enjoyable.

By focusing on activities the breed was designed to execute this training can be very beneficial to your Golden Retrievers temperament and health.

Obedience training

The purpose of obedience training is to teach your puppy how to perform various activities. This training focuses on a dog's general behavior, as well as teaching them to be well behaved.

Most dogs who successfully complete a class in obedience training are well behaved and listen to your commands. If you want a well behaved and obedient Golden enroll your puppy in an obedience training class as soon as your vet gives it their blessing.

Bear in mind there are distinctions between each type of training. Obedience training for example, won't help with the overall behavior of your Golden Retriever puppy. When selecting a class for your Golden puppy, you want to select a class that fits you and your dogs needs at that point in time.

If you are having trouble controlling your puppy, start with behavior training, which is usually the first type of training for most Golden owners.

When looking at training classes, consider which area your Golden needs help. Sometimes behavior patterns are the result of boredom, which is typically corrected by spending more time with your dog. After spending more time with your dog you'll typically notice this pattern will stop.

At other times they may require more help with certain behavior patterns, which is where training comes into play. Golden Retrievers are smart dogs, but they still won't know if they are doing something wrong unless you let them know.

Before you begin training Golden retrievers you need to decide what specifically it is you want to teach them. All puppies love routine and Golden's are no different, so they'll feel more relaxed when on a predictable schedule. When you take your puppy to training, be patient with them and reassure them when they're doing well.

As your Golden puppy gets older and learn new activities, in the unlikely event they start to slip on some of their training, don't be afraid to through a training course again to reinforce the techniques.

This way, the Golden retriever puppy training you applied will result in the ideal companion you grow to love over the years.

Golden Retriever Crate Training

Many people unfortunately have the wrong idea regarding crates when it comes to Golden Retriever crate training.

This misconception leads people to believe crates are a form of punishment for your Golden and subsequently won’t use them as they should be.

This is sad as crates are actually one of the safest places for your Golden Retriever, because it plays right into their natural instinct to retire inside a den.

When you bring your new puppy home for the first time, you should have their crate ready and positioned in your home where you want it to be.

The ideal place to set the up their crate is in a central area in your home, just not in an area with lots of foot traffic.

Many people tend to put them in the kitchen near a door, so their puppy can go outside whenever they need to relieve themselves.

When you bring your golden retriever puppy home, put him inside the house and let them start searching for their crate.

Chances are good that if you have a crate and leave it open, your Golden puppy will start to explore it as a safe place to hide or be away from the family when tired.

Although dog's generally like crates, don't overuse it by having them spend hours at a time inside it.

While crate training your golden in order to get them used to it, don't let them out if they're barking.

When your Golden starts to use the crate, leave them in it for an hour, like when you are away from home, and see how they respond.

Leave the door to the crate open, because your Golden puppy should start to wander in and out and explore it.

You can also put a toy or treat inside the crate, in order to to give your puppy added incentive to go inside.

Once they enter and stay inside the crate, praise them and let them know they're doing the right thing.

If during your Golden Retriever crate training they stay in the crate on their own, praise them for it, because you want to reinforce the behaviour you want.

Once your golden gets in the habit of going into the crate on their own, place a new toy or treat inside for him to play with as another way to encourage the use of the crat

After a period of time, close the door and see how they react. If they start whining, talk to them and although you don't want to immediately take them out of the crate, wait for them to first settle down

Even though it can take time and patience, crate training is great for your golden retriever.

There are plenty of opportunities to use the crate, such as when you need to leave the house, when you have family visit or for when your Golden has a medical condition requiring quiet and no activity.

If you apply patience and never use it as punishment your Golden Retriever crate training will go smoothly and make for a happy dog - and family.

Golden Retriever Potty Training

All Puppies are adorable and sweet, but they also have to pee and poo and it is up to the owner to undertake Golden Retriever potty training to shop them where and how they should do this.

Golden retrievers, like any dog, aren't born knowing the right time and place to do their business, so if we want to potty train our puppies, we have to show them.

There are four main things that it takes to be successful at potty training:

  • Confinement​
  • Praise
  • Training
  • Timing

To make potty training easier, it is smart to use a crate or cage to train Golden Retrievers where and when they should go potty.

It is best to leave nothing in the crate for now, since puppies will simply have a grand time tearing it to bits.

Since most dogs will not pee or poop where they live, they will wait until you let them out to use the potty.

The crate doesn't need to be big, just large enough so the puppy can turn around. If it is bigger, the puppy will just use one end of the crate to poo and pee, and sleep at the other end.

Praise and Training- It is a good idea to use a leash when training Golden Retrievers to potty outside. This enables you to have more control over what the puppy does, since they are notoriously distractible.

Anything new will gain their attention, and with a leash, you can always pull them back and remind them what they are supposed to be focusing on in the yard.

It is a good idea to teach your Golden Retriever puppy certain words so that they know when and where to use the potty. These can be anything, like pee, poop, or whatever you chose.

Just remember that you will have to us this phrase repeatedly.

Using the word "outside" when getting ready to take your pup out will allow them to associate outside with using the potty.

Soon, you can simply ask your dog if they have to go outside, and they will answer by barking, running to the door, or wagging their tail.

Make outside fun for any Golden Retriever training by saying it in a way that causes excitement. After you are outside with your puppy, tell them the potty phrase you use, and try to keep him in a certain area.

When he does his business, praise him with words like "good Boy go potty!" or things like that.

Avoid the use of treats since this can distract your puppy from what they are doing. Be sure to praise your puppy as he is doing his business, not after.

You should let your pup out of his crate when he has went outside and eliminated. You need to watch them closely, so if they decide to use the house as a potty, you can quickly take them outside.

Having a short leash always on your Golden Retriever puppy is good, since this will enable you to get to him quickly when he starts doing things that aren't appropriate.

With a little work, Golden Retriever potty training can be successful because the benefit to you is ridding your home of accidents.

Training Golden Retriever Puppies

Nothing is more obvious than the difference between how dogs and people learn and this is particularly true when it comes to training golden retriever puppies.

A dog can't respond like we do, because they don't understand the difference between right and wrong.

As an alternative, when you approach training golden retrievers you need to understand they function on a rule of response, guided by the measures you present them.

If the golden retrievers actions lead to a bad outcome from you, they grasp what they are doing is wrong and will steer clear of that form of conduct.

If your golden puppy does something right they should be praised for it. If your dog is listening to what you say and performing correctly, you should reward him with treats or praise. Letting the dog know he is doing well leads to constructive response.

On the other hand, if he isn't paying attention to you or doing the complete opposite of what you want, you shouldn't reward them at all - instead scold him with a strong no.

When undertaking golden retriever puppy training, timing is the the critical factor. If your golden puppy is doing something wrong, don't hesitate to correct them. Not doing so can transmit the wrong message.

When your Golden is doing something incorrectly, correct them right then and there, so they distinguish immediately what they are doing wrong.

For example, if the Golden Retriever is chasing cars, you evidently want to break this habit as soon as possible.

The second you see him doing this, stop them and let him know they're wrong. This way, he will understand chasing cars is something they shouldn't be doing.

It may take time for the dog to understand this, and you'll need to stand firm and continue to correct him when doing a behaviour you don't approve.

This type of theory is comparable to praise. When training golden retrievers if you notice them doing something correctly, instantly praise them.

If you don't quickly praise him and wait until the dog has stopped, believe you are praising him for stopping.

To get the best from your golden retriever puppy training, reward them when behaving the right way, then correct them when acting in a negative way.

If you show patience with your dog, you shouldn't experience any issues when training. The training process can take a while, although it is more than worth your effort in the end.

Once trained, your dog will react to what you want and avoid doing the things they have been trained to not do.

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Golden Retriever Adoption

For people who want a great family dog but don't want to go through the challenges of a puppy, consider going the Golden Retriever adoption route.

Older, mature Golden Retrievers have proven to be excellent additions to family life. These dogs are an adaptable breed, as well as having a great temperament.

No matter how old the adopted Golden is, they quickly become a valued part of your family once they have adapted to the pace and ambience of your family.

We can't stress enough how important basic "house manners" training is for an adopted or rescued Golden Retriever.

Golden Retriever Adoption

Another place to consider finding a Golden is with breeders. Quite often, breeders have older, retired dogs for sale and there are a couple of reasons why.

Some include show dogs who no longer have the potential to win, males used for breeding, females who have had a few litters then retired, or special situations where a breeder may be assisting a friend with a Golden Retriever adoption.

Getting a Mature Golden Retriever

On the plus side, most older Golden Retrievers are housebroken, are often fully trained, and know how to adapt to a new family situation.

Needless to say, it will be tough on the dog in the beginning, but by giving them plenty of love, attention, and patience, they'll begin to fit in and become a part of the family.

The primary thing you need to do is regularly assure your adopted Golden and let them know you're the new pack leader. Let them know as best you can that you're happy they're a member of the family.

If you're considering Golden Retriever adoption, you want to learn everything you can about the breed so you know what to expect and can deal with any breed specific issues that may arise.

You also want to get a sense of the dogs temperament and if they'll be compatible as part of your family.

Some of the important aspects you should understand about your adopted golden are their diet, what constitutes their daily routine, their excersie needs, and habits.

Before you bring them home make sure all the family members meet the dog, so everyone can talk it over and decide if everyone wants the Golden to become a family member.

When taking an older dog, you need to help them for the first few days in order to let him know where everything in your home is located. Show him where they will sleep, how to go outside, where to eliminate, and where you feed them in the house.

Take your time and be patient, because it normally takes a new dog a few days to learn how and where things are in your home.

As a rule of thumb, give your new Golden Retriever a minimum of a month to get used to their new surroundings before you begin any type of obedience training.

Even if you know your dog had prior obedience training, it's still a good idea to get them in a new class if for no other reason than it reinforces you as their pack leader.

Any Golden Retriever, no matter what their age may be, loves attention. Older dogs however, may have medical issues you aren't aware of, which can cause them to be more withdrawn than normal.

This shouldn't stop you from bringing one into your family, because the rewards you get far exceed any issues the Golden may have as you understand their unique needs.

Although many people don't give much thought to Golden Retriever adoption - these wonderful dogs are ideal for families who don't have the time or desire to go through the challenges of raising a puppy.

English Golden Retrievers: Are They a Different Breed?

Although they are not officially classified as separate breeds or even distinct varieties of the same breed, there are three main types of Golden Retrievers.

In no particular order, they include English Golden Retrievers (sometimes called "English Cream Golden Retrievers"), American Golden Retrievers and Canadian Golden Retrievers.

If these types of Golden Retrievers haven't yet been classified separately by the respective breed registry bodies of any country (for example, the UK's Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club or the Canadian Kennel Club), is there anything that really sets English Golden Retrievers apart from the other types?

All three types of Golden Retriever possess a friendly, eager-to-please, affectionate demeanor, but they also have many other characteristics in common, including loyalty, gentleness and intelligence.

Despite their many common features, however, there are some distinct differences.

That said, the distinctions between the types are in their appearance, not their personality or temperament.

English Golden Retriever 

The English Golden Retriever is the original type, with the American and Canadian types diverging from it during and after World War II.

In general, the English Golden Retriever can be regarded as being more faithful to the original Golden Retriever body type than the more recently evolved Canadian and American versions.

Over the course of time, American Golden Retrievers evolved into a slightly leaner, lighter dog while English Golden Retrievers retained their heavier, stockier, more muscled body structure.

The English Golden Retriever's skull is broader and the forequarters in particular are more muscular. Its forehead is blockier and its muzzle is a bit wider and shorter.

English Golden Retrievers also have sturdier, shorter legs, slightly deeper chests and shorter tails. Overall, they present a heavier, more square appearance than American Golden Retrievers.

English Golden Retrievers are also known for their round, dark eyes. In contrast, the eyes of the American type are more triangular or even slanted and have a slightly lighter, medium to dark brown color.

All Golden Retrievers have gorgeous coats, but there are some differences between the coats of the American and English varieties, particularly in coat length, texture and color.

The American variety features fluffy, lushly plumed coats, while English Golden Retrievers typically have slightly wavier coats that are less fluffy but much thicker.

All Golden Retrievers are "golden" to one degree or another, but as the name implies, English Cream Golden Retrievers tend to be lighter in color than the other varieties.

Unlike the American and Canadian Kennel Club breed standards, the British standard specifically permits cream colored coats.

The coats of English Golden Retrievers typically range from a pure light cream, to cream touched by gold, to a dusting of gold throughout the coat.

Some English Golden Retrievers have darker golden coats, but this coloration is much more unusual in English dogs than in the Canadian or American variety.

In general, you can view this type as being the classic, traditional Golden Retriever first developed more than 100 years ago.

If you're in the United States you might not see them quite as often as American Golden Retrievers, but English Golden Retrievers are much more popular in the United Kingdom, throughout continental Europe and in Australia, and they're gaining ground rapidly in the United States.

Golden Retriever Puppy Care

A Golden Retriever puppy is one of the most adorable breeds of dogs to be found anywhere. These wonderful active little balls of fluff will be a welcome addition to your family.

However, in order for this adorable puppy to live a long, healthy and well adjusted life in your home you will need to know a few things about Golden Retriever Puppy care.

Golden Retriever Puppy Care

Here are just a few of the basics that you'll need to get a handle on if you want to provide your golden with the best possible start in life.

Preparing for your Golden puppys arrival

Your Golden's puppy care starts now before you your ever bring your puppy home. You begin by finding and reading as much information possible about this breed of animal. Also read everything you can find on house, breaking, crate training and leash training.

By preparing yourself now to meet your puppy's and your family needs you feel more confident about building a relationship with your new pet. Get all the supplies your puppy needs in advance of his arrival:

  • Food
  • Dishes
  • Collars
  • Leashes 
  • Grooming products
  • Toys
  • Crate
  • Bed

All of the above should all be in place before his arrival so that you can begin caring for him properly the moment he arrives.

Establish Rules and Habits

Part of Golden Retriever puppy care is establishing the rules your new pet needs to follow as soon as he arrives. If he is not going to be allowed to be on the furniture then keep him off right from the first day. Also begin to housebreak him and introduce him to his crate.

The sooner you start establishing routines the quicker he will learn.

Vet Care and Grooming

An important part of puppy care is making sure that your puppy has adequate health care.As soon as possible take him for a well puppy check up and make sure he gets all his inoculations and time.

Part of Golden Retriever puppy care is grooming your new puppy. Retrievers have double coats that need frequent brushing. They also need to have the fur around their ears and paws trimmed and their tails trimmed as well. You will have to bath and clip your puppies toe nails on a regular basis as well.

Attention and Exercise

Golden Retriever puppy care includes exercise and attention to help keep your dog healthy and happy. Combined the two by actively interacting with your puppy. Playing games of fetch and finding swimming opportunities for him are two great ways of seeing he gets the proper exercise and attention.

Make sure he has plenty of toys he can chew or roll around to play with when you are not with him as his mind as well as his body needs ample exercising.

Training and Socialization

Begin as soon as possible training and socializing your Golden. He should at least obey basic commands such as "come, sit, and stay." as well as be well behaved on a leash.

Take him with you as often as possible so he can gain new experiences and meet new people and animals. Keep in mind that most behavior problems in dogs are cause because of lack of attention, exercise, or just plain boredom. By following these Golden Retriever puppy care tips you can avoid behavioral problems as you will be giving your puppy everything he needs to grow into a well behaved dog.

Choosing a Golden Retriever Puppy

Does a male or female Golden Retriever make a better pet? There's no way of settling that question for sure, so for most people the choice comes down to personal preference.

You should consider some differences, however, because even spaying and neutering does not make males and females the same. If you do not plan to spay or neuter your pet the differences are more distinct.

Females are generally moodier and males, although more constant in temperament, can be constantly annoying in the pursuit of such male-Golden Retriever activities as sex, leg-lifting, and territory protection.

Unspayed females usually come into season for a couple weeks twice a year, during which you need to deal with a varying amount of mess and the constant attention of canine suitors.

Unneutered males may be less than attentive when such attractions beckon. They can also be more likely to challenge your leadership - or anyone else's.

Studies have shown, for example, that young unneutered males are the most likely to be involved in attacks on children. Spaying or neutering generally evens things out a bit.It makes females more emotionally constant and males less likely to fight or roam. But differences remain.

In some breeds, for example, males are considerably larger than females - as much as 20 or 30 pounds and two or three inches. For details, you can purchase books that contain the official AKC breed standards, including size. This should give you an idea of the size difference to expect.

However, some differences aren't so easily defined. In the more dominant breeds, such as the Rottweiler, a female may be sweeter and more anxious to please.

In the more shy and standoffish breeds, such as the Shetland sheep Golden Retriever, a male may be more outgoing and friendly. In some breeds, such a golden retriever, you might not notice much difference at all.

It's a better idea to concentrate on the breed or breed type rather than the gender, since the toughest male of an easy-going breed is probably a bigger cupcake than the mildest female of a breed with dominant tendencies.

Talking to reputable breeders gives you a clear picture how the sexes differ not only in the breed as a whole, but also in particular breeding lines.

For some people, the choice comes down to matter of landscaping: Males often kill shrubs by lifting their legs on them, females often kill lawns by squatting.Although some males squat and some females lift (at least some of the time), the generalization is pretty much on the mark.